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Hope
21-Jun-2004, 05:07 PM
As salamu alikum warahmatu Allah wa Barakatuhu...

i have noticed that many people refuse to say Mashallah and instead say tabarak allah.. i would like to know what reasons are behind this!?!?

i know that shiekh faiez has addressed this issue and told people not to say Mashallah :eek: ...im confused into why this is done!!!

please forgive me if i have offended you...wallahi it has not been my intention.

As salamu Alaikum.

Stranger
21-Jun-2004, 05:20 PM
sis, its because it was never said back in the prophet (pbuh) days. its a word that has been made up of now...never said in the Prophets (pbuh) days.

correct me if im wrong...

Tay_
21-Jun-2004, 05:25 PM
Neither was the word tafsir or aqeedah used also, but we use those words today...

Hope
21-Jun-2004, 05:26 PM
but it means something so beautiful...

Ma-Shaa-Allah
What Allah wills

and nothing can be done without the will of Allah!!!

Hope
21-Jun-2004, 05:39 PM
but why would he say that?

i have had numerous arguments with my sister (who goes to giyc whereas i dont) and i still dont get why he would tell people not to say Mashallah!! :o

salams

Hope
21-Jun-2004, 05:48 PM
allahu alim...

but that is exactly what i was told!

SuBMiSSioN
21-Jun-2004, 08:15 PM
Hmmm that's the first I ever hear of that..hmmm Allah swt knows best

SuBMiSSioN
21-Jun-2004, 09:27 PM
Well that's what I was thinking..it is mentioned in the Quraan..so it's a bit err. I'm assuming that there must be another reason behind it, but I can't see what it would be. Allahu ya3lam

Stranger
21-Jun-2004, 09:48 PM
sis, i dont think he said we shouldnt full stop...i think he said we shouldnt keep the habit...best to do and say what the prophet (pbuh) said and did...Allahu a3lam.

Shadower
21-Jun-2004, 09:55 PM
I knew I remembered it from the Quraan. Maybe Sh. Feiz just made a mistake. Tabarakallah or Mashaallah both are good and both praise Allah. It is not like the person is praising other than Allah.

And I do not know if words can hit the "bidah list" as there are many languages the Muslims speak that Muhammad saws never spoke also. Lets not push it insha`Allah.

aussiemu
21-Jun-2004, 10:43 PM
assalamu 'alaikum,

I think it's best its not attributed to him unless theres a 100% sure on his comments. So talk about the topic in general insha'Allah.. I've never heard of it being called a bi'dah by anyone though. Might be good to email giyc to find out if anyone is interested.

wassalamu 'alaikum

aussiemu
21-Jun-2004, 11:51 PM
alhamdulillah. all good is from allah and the rest is from me or shaytan.

Shadower
22-Jun-2004, 12:31 AM
Aah Rebel Rex

pass salaam
22-Jun-2004, 08:20 PM
What sheikh feiz was possibly talking about, as I saw in one of his videos, was about the hadeeth of saying tabarakullah when seeing something beautiful as the prophet (saws) commanded the sahabah to do so.

pass salaam
22-Jun-2004, 08:34 PM
Imam Ahmad (15550), Maalik (1811), al-Nasaa’i and Ibn Hibbaan narrated from Sahl ibn Haneef that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) came out and traveled with him towards Makkah, until they were in the mountain pass of al-Kharaar in al-Jahfah. There Sahl ibn Haneef did ghusl, and he was a handsome white-skinned man with beautiful skin. ‘Aamir ibn Rabee’ah, one of Banu ‘Adiyy ibn Ka’b looked at him whilst he was doing ghusl and said: “I have never seen such beautiful skin as this, not even the skin of a virgin,” and Sahl fell to the ground. They went to Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) came and said, “O Messenger of Allaah, can you do anything for Sahl, because by Allaah he cannot raise his head.” He said, “Do you accuse anyone with regard to him?” They said, “ ‘Aamir ibn Rabee’ah looked at him.” So the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) called ‘Aamir and rebuked him strongly. He said, “Why would one of you kill his brother? If you see something that you like, then pray for blessing for him. (Tabarakullah)” Then he said to him, “Wash yourself for him.” So he washed his face, hands, forearms, knees and the sides of his feet, and inside his izaar (lower garment) in the vessel. Then that water was poured over him, and a man poured it over his head and back from behind. He did that to him, then Sahl got up and joined the people and there was nothing wrong with him.

Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Mishkaat, 4562.

Shadower
23-Jun-2004, 12:03 AM
That is probably what he was talking about. He might have been miss-quoted.

pass salaam
23-Jun-2004, 10:58 AM
but you understand now where we say mash'Allah when we should be saying tabarakullah

Shadower
23-Jun-2004, 11:04 AM
I also do not see a problem with saying Masha`Allah.

pass salaam
23-Jun-2004, 11:14 AM
well if the Prophet (saws) commanded tabarakullah I can see why it is 'better'

Stranger
23-Jun-2004, 04:51 PM
^^ aha

Shadower
23-Jun-2004, 06:25 PM
And Masha`Allah is a word mentioned by Allah in the Quraan ...
Really brother the argument can be taken both ways

aussiemu
23-Jun-2004, 06:34 PM
assalamu 'alaikum,

Can someone please name a scholar of the past who has said that saying masha'Allah is wrong?

jazakallah khair

wassalamu 'alaikum

Hope
24-Jun-2004, 12:22 AM
jazakullah khair that will be great..

Islamic Creature
24-Jun-2004, 09:22 AM
there is nothing wrong with saying mashaa-Allah, but Tabarak-Allah is stronger,

Stranger
24-Jun-2004, 10:50 AM
we didnt get to have time for questions and answers...they took the tv off straight away....anyways

yeah agree wiv creature...Tabrakallah is stronger to use, so use it inshallah.

but no one is stopping u to say Mashallah, at least now we aint :p

pass salaam
24-Jun-2004, 05:29 PM
I am not saying mash'Allah is wrong!
I just used the hadith Sheikh Feiz did and the hadith clarifies the context you use it in sah?

pass salaam
24-Jun-2004, 06:49 PM
LoL

Shadower
24-Jun-2004, 11:04 PM
Doesn't say its better though, as some have pointed out.

pass salaam
25-Jun-2004, 05:07 PM
Doesn't say it is better yes, I do not know where they got that from but like I said we know what context to use it in now.

Shadower
25-Jun-2004, 05:14 PM
Na3am

amatul_rahmaan
04-Jan-2006, 06:46 AM
i was just going through this thread and hoping i will find someone who have pointed out the meaning for both words but Subhan Allah i didn't find any.

i know you are clear now on whether you should say ma sha'allah or not. also you said that Tabarak Allah is stronger to use because it's mentioned in the hadith.

well i would like to add something and maybe in sha'allah this will explains when to say each one:

Ma Sha'Allah = What Allah wills.
Tabarak Allah = May Allah bless this thing.

so when you look at the meaning, it makes more clear that the using of ma sha'allah is wrong because we usually use as way of saying may Allah bless this thing and we never really thought about it's meaning. maybe that's what the sheikh meant.

subhan allah, i always use ma sha'allah because i never thought about it but after reading this thread i will try to use Tabarak Allah in sha'allah because this is the meaning that i usually mean.

Abu Layla
04-Jan-2006, 07:15 PM
I agree with Tay on this one, there's nothing wrong with saying either, if one's better then it's better... masha'Allah/Tabarkullah ... alhamdulillah... but let's not start throwing fits and fists for something that in the end really is insignificant to argue or debate about. There's nothing wrong with saying either, let's rest now and take some deep breaths.

One day some brother is going to kill another because he wants to prove saying tabarakullah is better than masha'Allah... how beautiful that'd be on the Day of Judgment.

Musa
04-Jan-2006, 10:42 PM
TabaarakAllahu Ta'ala 'Alaykum...

Abu Layla
04-Jan-2006, 10:43 PM
Wa Iyak
I hope that was a correct reply?

Musa
04-Jan-2006, 10:49 PM
it would be - Wa `Alaykum.

Hate having to teach these Arabs how to speak their own language...

Abu Layla
04-Jan-2006, 10:52 PM
LOL I am more Lebanese than Arabic speaking, inshaa'Allah I will convert to Arabic soon :)

Musa
05-Jan-2006, 11:59 AM
May Allah guide you, I've seen many try, and many fail.

Just stay clear of Newport, most of the northern suburbs, completely clear of Lebanon, and go nowhere near my in-laws, and you just might stand a chance.

amatul_rahmaan
06-Jan-2006, 04:08 PM
this thread have been driving me nuts for a couple of days now because as i said in my previous post when you look at the arabic meaning it's more appropriate to say Tabarak Allah than ma sha'allah because of it's arabic meaning.

but a sister told me that i'm wrong and kind of told me off for it so i was searching and talking to another sister and subhan allah. she was able to figure out the difference and when it should be used for each one.

Ma sha'allah = What Allah wills

Tabarak Allah = May Allah bless it.

how to use each:

i'm going to cook ma sha' allah = i'm going to cook what allah wills (whatever it will be)

i cooked a nice meal tabrak allah = i cooked a nice meal, may allah bless it.

i just thought about sharing this with you now i'm going to have a hard time to practice using each on in the right situation but it's worth it in sha'allah.

amatul_rahmaan
06-Jan-2006, 04:22 PM
ok, another thing so no one will get confused *if you don't know it already*

Ma sha' allah = what Allah wills (whatever Allah wants)

but

In Sha' allah = IF Allah wills (if allah wants it to happen)

theory
06-Jan-2006, 05:06 PM
this thread have been driving me nuts for a couple of days now because as i said in my previous post when you look at the arabic meaning it's more appropriate to say Tabarak Allah than ma sha'allah because of it's arabic meaning.

but a sister told me that i'm wrong and kind of told me off for it so i was searching and talking to another sister and subhan allah. she was able to figure out the difference and when it should be used for each one.

Ma sha'allah = What Allah wills

Tabarak Allah = May Allah bless it.

how to use each:

i'm going to cook ma sha' allah = i'm going to cook what allah wills (whatever it will be)

i cooked a nice meal tabrak allah = i cooked a nice meal, may allah bless it.

i just thought about sharing this with you now i'm going to have a hard time to practice using each on in the right situation but it's worth it in sha'allah.

Sister, if u look at where it says ma sha' Allah in surat alkahf it says
after the surah talked about a man who was showing off about how beautiful and full of fruit his garden was, his friend told him


39 It was better for you to say, when you entered your garden: That which Allah wills (will come to pass)! There is no power but with Allah . If you see me less than you in wealth, and children.

So we should say ma sha'a Allah when some thing good happens to us admitting that this is not because we are smart or because we are fit or because we are lucky or kind or anything but that Allah (SWT) willed it for us and that there is no power for anything to happen but with Allah (SWT)
That's the context in which we say ma sha' Allah.

Musa
06-Jan-2006, 05:29 PM
And we also send Allah's blessings on a brother or sister to protect them from the evil eye, as reported in the ahaadith.

And we also say Allahu Akbar, and La Hawla wa la Quwwata illa billah, and many other things.

Whatever we say, may it be from the Qur'an and the Sunnah, said with understanding, and said often.

amatul_rahmaan
06-Jan-2006, 06:23 PM
i realise that bu i never thought about it's meaning untill i saw this thread then later on i realised that i use in wrong situation and same for lots of poeple who i know.

the thing are we using the right words in the right place or we are using it in the wrong place, can you see where i'm coming from ??

theory
06-Jan-2006, 06:28 PM
I'll use the example of cooking you gave



i'm going to cook ma sha' allah = i'm going to cook what allah wills (whatever it will be)

ma sha' Allah uses the verb sha' in the past tense so it means "What Allah willed" if you want to say "What Allah wills" you say ma yasha' Allah



i cooked a nice meal tabrak allah = i cooked a nice meal, may allah bless it.

In this siutation there is nothing wrong with saying ma sha' Allah because then you mean, I cooked a nice meal and that is what Allah willed (ie: not because I am a good cook was it nice but because Allah willed it was nice :) )
Ofcourse saying tabarak Allah is fine aswell :)

amatul_rahmaan
06-Jan-2006, 06:34 PM
i know what you mean

but

first one, i didn't use it as past tense.

the second one i used it as may allah bless it

(whenever we say ma sha'allah we hardly mean what allah wills but most of the time we mean may allah bless it and that's why i believe tabarak allah is more appropriate)

theory
06-Jan-2006, 06:38 PM
I'm going to cook ma sha' allah = i'm going to cook what allah wills (whatever it will be)




first one, i didn't use it as past tense.


ma sha' Allah is past tense can't use it for future :)

but all we need to know is what we mean when we are saying something and thats it, if its in the Quran and sunna and we know what it means then we say it :)

Musa
06-Jan-2006, 08:08 PM
I will do whatever Allah has written for me.

written (kataba) is past tense, yet I use it in reference to the future...

So cooking in the future what Allah has willed makes perfect sense.

Man, I already proved to you that thing about the 'th' being a 's' in Egyptian and now this?!? Maybe I should be teaching you!

Patience
06-Jan-2006, 08:36 PM
i asked this question to Sh Abdulsalam Zoud and he told me that it doesnt matter what u say as long as u mention the name of Allah SWT. I dont think ppl should b so involved with this issue. Like honestly, there r more serious issues at hand. Dont let the shaytaan interfer with ur relationship with Allah swt by filling up ur time with usless things :rolleyes:

theory
06-Jan-2006, 08:48 PM
I will do whatever Allah has written for me.

written (kataba) is past tense, yet I use it in reference to the future...
[quote]
I get ya know because Allah already has willed or has written everything that will happen, this is more to do with belief than language, but you are right :)


[quote]
Man, I already proved to you that thing about the 'th' being a 's' in Egyptian and now this?!? Maybe I should be teaching you!
U criticise me cause I don't know the egyptian slang :D lol thank you atleast I know arabic ........ kinda :D

amatul_rahmaan
06-Jan-2006, 09:25 PM
lol, sis we are not arguing about if it's wrong or right.

we are trying to understand the correct meaning of the word in the arabic language so we will know how to use it.

Jazak Alah khairan Musa, i was trying to think about a way to explain to thoery what i mean but you saved me and explained it in a better way Tabarak allah :D

Musa
06-Jan-2006, 09:31 PM
Dun worry theory, Inshaa'Allah we will all speak the same language in Jannah, without any confusion.

May Allah make us of those who earn His Mercy.

theory
06-Jan-2006, 09:34 PM
insha'allah :) akhy

may be we should start a thread, with common phrases and put their meaning, like subhan' Allah, alhamdulilah, Allahu Akbar etc... and any other words we use to remember Allah.

amatul_rahmaan
06-Jan-2006, 11:17 PM
that will be such a great idea. i actually had a sister asking me if we always say things without thinking about it's meaning or it's only this word so this will be a very good idea in sha'allah.

Patience
07-Jan-2006, 12:00 AM
that will be such a great idea. i actually had a sister asking me if we always say things without thinking about it's meaning or it's only this word so this will be a very good idea in sha'allah.

remember as well that a meeting where the name of Allah is mentioned, the angels gather and protect u. Mashallah/tabarak Allah whatever lol

theory
07-Jan-2006, 09:09 AM
in sha' Allah if we remember Allah's name using one of the forms perscribed in the Q'uran and sunna we will be rewarded for that, but if we know what it means that will be better :)

Patience
07-Jan-2006, 04:49 PM
in sha' Allah if we remember Allah's name using one of the forms perscribed in the Q'uran and sunna we will be rewarded for that, but if we know what it means that will be better :)


Akeed :)

Please, dont b offended by any of my comments. Remember that i came late into the conversation so yeh, i didnt really know what was going on. Sorry everyone :o

theory
07-Jan-2006, 04:50 PM
its ok ukhty I was never offended by your comment, I am sorry it sounded like I was :)

eisa
09-Jan-2006, 06:08 PM
Question:
what is the difference between saying mash'Allah and tabarakullah? muslims usually say mash'Allah at the time when the Prophet (saws) used tabarakullah

Imam Ahmad (15550), Maalik (1811), al-Nasaa’i and Ibn Hibbaan narrated from Sahl ibn Haneef that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) came out and traveled with him towards Makkah, until they were in the mountain pass of al-Kharaar in al-Jahfah. There Sahl ibn Haneef did ghusl, and he was a handsome white-skinned man with beautiful skin. ‘Aamir ibn Rabee’ah, one of Banu ‘Adiyy ibn Ka’b looked at him whilst he was doing ghusl and said: “I have never seen such beautiful skin as this, not even the skin of a virgin,” and Sahl fell to the ground. They went to Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) came and said, “O Messenger of Allaah, can you do anything for Sahl, because by Allaah he cannot raise his head.” He said, “Do you accuse anyone with regard to him?” They said, “ ‘Aamir ibn Rabee’ah looked at him.” So the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) called ‘Aamir and rebuked him strongly. He said, “Why would one of you kill his brother? If you see something that you like, then pray for blessing for him. (Tabarakullah)” Then he said to him, “Wash yourself for him.” So he washed his face, hands, forearms, knees and the sides of his feet, and inside his izaar (lower garment) in the vessel. Then that water was poured over him, and a man poured it over his head and back from behind. He did that to him, then Sahl got up and joined the people and there was nothing wrong with him. Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Mishkaat, 4562.




Dear questioner:



Al-Salâm `alaykum wa Rahmah Allah wa Barakâtuh.



It was related that `Âmir b. Rabî`ah passed by Sahl b. Hanîf and looked (with envy) on his complexion. It was only a short time thereafter when Sahl became sick. The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: “Why would one of you kill his brother? If some of you see something he likes in his brother, he should pray on his behalf for blessings.



This means that he should say: “Tabâraka-llah” or “Bâraka-llah”.



Allah says in the Qur’ân: “You said: It is as Allah has pleased, there is no power except with Allah.” (mâ shâ’Allah, lâ quwwata ilâ bi-llâh)



Therefore, it is from Sunnah to say: “It is as Allah has pleased, there is no power except with Allah.



And Allah knows best.



Fatwâ Department Research Committee of IslamToday chaired by Sheikh `Abd al-Wahhâb al-Turayrî

Khaled
06-Feb-2006, 01:02 AM
InshaAllah or Bi Ithnillaah?

amatul_rahmaan
06-Feb-2006, 08:38 AM
in sha'allah = if Allah wills

Bi Ithnillah = with the permissioin of Allah.

both of them have pretty much the same meaning and are used in the same situations but for some reason in sha'allah is more common than be ezn ellah.

Khaled
06-Feb-2006, 05:39 PM
And Ithaa Allah Rodd. That means also If God wills.

amatul_rahmaan
06-Feb-2006, 08:53 PM
yea but in Fusha Arabic, it's: Iza Arad Allah

مروة
25-Apr-2009, 11:37 PM
:salam:

Someone requested this so I thought I would share it with others as well insha' Allah.

This is taken from Sh. Muhammad Al-Jibaly's emailing group:

Questioner:

Some people say that there is no evidence to say Masha Allah to avert the evil eye and they says because the hadith says to invoke the blessings of Allah, i.e. to say Barakallah Feek, so is this position true or is there some other explanation that I dont know that shows that saying Masha Allah is ok also.


Answer:

As-salaamu `alaykum wa-rahmat Ullaah.

There are three considerations in this regard:

1. What "some people" told you is true. There is no evidence for saying "Maa shaa'Allaah" (It is according to Allah's will) for protection from the evil eye. Rather, when a man struck another with the evil eye, the Prophet (S) told him, "Should you not have invoked blessings for him?" Therefore, if you see something that you like with other people, you should invoke barakah to protect against your striking them with the evil eye.

2. If you want to protect yourself against the evil eye of other people, you say one of the ruqyahs against envy that are reported in the Sunnah, such as reciting the mu'awwidthaat. I have discussed this in detail in my books: "Sickness, Regulations & Exhortations" and "Our Precious Sprouts".

3. "Maa shaa'Allaah", on the other hand, is said when you realize some of Allaah's (T) favors on you. You say it so as to suppress any feeling of arrogance or ingratitude. This is clearly understood from the story in soorat al-kahf about the the rich man with the two gardens.

Wallaahu a`lam (Allaah knows best).
Abu `Abdillaah Muhammad al-Jibaly
Al-Madeenah al-Munawwarah

cheesegirl
25-Apr-2009, 11:48 PM
^Does that mean we use mashaAllah in the way we use alhamdulillah?

مروة
25-Apr-2009, 11:57 PM
Alhamdulellah and Masha Allah are quite different in meaning, so I dont get what u mean cheesegirl :)

cheesegirl
26-Apr-2009, 12:02 AM
The article said: "Maa shaa'Allaah", on the other hand, is said when you realize some of Allaah's (T) favors on you.

Don't we say alhamdulillah at that kind of time too?

Honestly, I never understood why we use the phrase mashaAllah the way we do.

Abu.Kauthar
26-Apr-2009, 12:25 AM
Masha'Allah means " what Allah wanted "

so when we say it, it's said in the meaning that......

this is what Allah wanted and it's a favour/blessing from Him which He wanted for me.

using any of them is not that different really....

but usually it wouldn't be appropriate to say Masha'Allah when something bad happens. even though it's really what Allah wanted but, we'd rather use Al Hamdullilah which would imply that we are accepting Allah's Will.

but if we use Masha'Allah with something bad.

it's like saying that one of Allah's favours upon me is that He sent me this bad thing or made it happen, which is not really a favour always, but it could be a punishment, or a result of something bad i did.

Abu.Kauthar
26-Apr-2009, 12:32 AM
by the way.....

the phrase Masha'Allah was said by the Prophet peace be upon Him. in the Hadith " if any of you gives an oath, let him not say " Masha'Allah (what Allah Wanted) and i wanted, but rather say " what Allah wanted and then i wanted "

in Ibn Majah 2117 and also a similar Hadith in Musnad Imam Ahmed and Al Nassa'ee (3773)

Palo $oldier
26-Apr-2009, 01:50 AM
wow,, this thread has alot of dust!

Musa
26-Apr-2009, 08:17 PM
I remember hearing from the Shaykh (unless I'm imagining it) that we are not supposed to say 'Tabaarak Allaah', rather we are supposed to ask Allaah to bless them (eg. Baarak Allaahu Feek).
The meaning of TabaarakAllaah is like saying 'Takbeer', we don't actually say 'Takbeer' rather we say 'Allaahu Akbar', similarly, TabaarakAllaah refers to the saying of Baarak Allaahu Feek.

Abu.Kauthar
26-Apr-2009, 10:17 PM
Tabark Allah was mentioned in the Quran in Surat Al Mu'mineen verse 14


......So blessed be Allah, the best to create!

تبارك الله أحسن الخالقين

Musa
26-Apr-2009, 11:00 PM
Yes, its mentioned in tyhe Qur'aan in a different context to the one being mentioned if I'm correct.

When we say 'TabaarakAllaah' we mean to ask Allaah to bless the person/thing, not to praise Allaah (as TabaarakAllaah means in the context of the Qur'aan). It seems that the 2 terms seem to convey the same meaning... I'm sure you can explain better Abu Kauthar if you may.

Abu.Kauthar
26-Apr-2009, 11:49 PM
yes i know what you are talking about Akhi.

but i don't think that the brothers/sisters are using Tabark Allah in the context you mentioned here unless i'm wrong and some really do that, in that case then yes what you are saying is true..


When we say 'TabaarakAllaah' we mean to ask Allaah to bless the person/thing

because in this case as you said earlier, you are suppose to say Barak Allahu Feek/Feeki.

using Tabark Allah, in the context you're talking about is linguistically incorrect. and Barak Allah Feek is the correct expression.

like for example.....

someone does something good for us, and want to praise this person and thank him, we'd say Barak Allah Feek, saying Tabark Allah doesn't mean you're praising the person but rather praising Allah or what has happened, which is ok, but the person doesn't get anything.

but if we see something good, say.... rain, a child, nice car...etc, then saying Tabark Allah is the right phrase or even Masha'Allah.

Wa Allahu A'laam.

Abu.Kauthar
26-Apr-2009, 11:53 PM
and in that occasion i'd like to add.....

that it's incorrect to say Mabrook, but rather we should say Mubarak.

because Mubarak means blessed, from Barakah which means blessing.

Mabrook is from Burook, which is the act of the the Camel sitting down.

so when people say to someone Mabrook, it's like saying to them, you're sitting down, or what has happened is sitting down like a camel.

to funny thing is.....

a lot of times people would say Mabrook 'Alaik. Mabrook upon you.

which means, the Camel is sitting on you. or you're sat upon.

personally i wouldn't like to be in such a situation

Palo $oldier
27-Apr-2009, 02:17 AM
^ we return to mabrook "Allah ybarik feek" which means may Allah give u baraka

Abu Layla
28-Apr-2009, 03:41 PM
Once a brother got married to a sister for a really high mahr... and people were saying Mabrook... I said Abarook. lol

Ariel
28-Apr-2009, 10:59 PM
If you see a beautiful child, what should one say? Tabarak Allah, Mash'Allah or is there a specific term which seeks Allah protection upon this child (or thing)? Is Allah Yahmeek or yahmeeki acceptable?

Umm Binyameen
26-Jan-2011, 08:56 PM
This has some relevance to the question.....

Can a man harm his beautiful wife with the “evil eye”?

I have a question about ayn. If a man were to say to his wife that she looks beautiful should he always say mashaa’Allaah, or is this excessive?

Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly:

the “evil eye” is real, as the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The evil eye is real, and if anything were to overtake the divine decree (al-qadar) it would be the evil eye.” (Narrated by Muslim, 2188, from the hadeeth of Ibn ‘Abbaas).

Al-Bukhaari (5048) and Muslim (2187) narrated the first part of this hadeeth from Abu Hurayrah.

Secondly:

the evil eye usually comes from people who are jealous or envious (hasad).

Ibn al-Qayyim said:

Everyone who gives the evil eye is jealous, but not everyone who is jealous gives the evil eye… then he said:

It begins when the person likes something, then his evil soul dwells on the matter, and by continually looking at the person who has the thing of which he feels jealous, he directs his venom towards him. A person may put the evil eye on himself, or he may put the evil eye on someone else without intending to, because it is is a part of his nature. This is the worst type of human being. Our companions and other fuqahaa’ said: if someone is known for this, he should be detained by the imaam (leader), who should spend on him and provide for him until he dies. This idea is absolutely correct… (Zaad al-Ma’aad, 4/167).

In the hadeeth, it says, “A’oodhu bi kalimaat-Illaah it-taamah min kulli shaytaanin wa haammah wa min kulli ‘aynin laammah (I seek refuge in the perfect words of Allaah from every devil and vermin and from every envious eye).” Narrated by al-Bukhaari (3191) from the hadeeth of Ibn ‘Abbaas.

The meaning of “vermin” (haammah) is lethally poisonous animals and insects.

The meaning of “envious” (laammah) is that which causes harm because of jealousy (hasad).

Thirdly:

Although it is correct that the evil eye comes from people who feel jealous (hasad), it may also come from a person who is not jealous but merely likes something, because of the hadeeth: “Whoever among you sees something in himself or in his possessions or in his brother that he likes, let him pray for blessing for it, because the evil eye is real.” Narrated by Ibn al-Sunni in ‘Aml al-Yawm wa’l-Laylah, p. 168; and by al-Haakim, 4/216. Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Kalim al-Tayyib, 243.

This hadeeth explains that a person may harm himself or his wealth – and no one feels jealous of himself – but he may harm himself with the evil eye by admiring himself, so it is even more possible that he may harm his wife in the same way.

Ibn al-Qayyim said:

And a man may put the evil eye on himself. (Zaa’d al-Ma’aad, 4/167).

Fourthly:

a man may harm his wife with the evil eye by looking at her and noticing her beauty and admiring her, even if he does not actually say to her “You are beautiful.” It is mustahabb for him to say, “Allaahumma baarik fihaa (O Allaah, bless her).”

It was reported from Abu Umaamah ibn Sahl ibn Hunayf that his father told him that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) went out and they travelled with him towards Makkah until they reached Shi’b al-Khazzaar in al-Juhfah. Sahl ibn Hunayf washed himself, and he was a white man with a handsome body and skin. ‘Aamir ibn Rabee’ah, the brother of Bani ‘Udayy ibn Ka’b, looked at him when he was washing, and said, “I have never seen anything like this, not even the skin of a virgin in seclusion!” (this was a metaphor for the intense whiteness of his skin). Then Sahl suffered a seizure (an epileptic fit, in which he fell to the ground). He was brought to the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and it was said, “O Messenger of Allaah, do you know what has happened to Sahl? By Allaah, he cannot raise his head and he will not wake up.” He said, “Do you accuse anyone with regard to him?” They said, “‘Aamir ibn Rabee’ah looked at him.” So the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) called ‘Aamir and spoke angrily with him, saying, “Would any of you like to kill his brother? If you see something that you like, why do you not pray for blessing for it?” Then he said to him (‘Aamir), “Do ghusl for him.” So he washed his face, hands, elbows, the soles of his feet and inside his izaar (lower garment) from a vessel, then that water was poured over him (Sahl) – a man poured it over his head and back from behind, tilting the vessel. This was done to him, then Sahl went on with the people and there was nothing wrong with him. (Al-Musnad, 3/486. Al-Haythami said: the men of Ahmad are the men of saheeh. Al-Majma’, 5/107).

Fifthly:

When they like something, some people say “Ma sha’ Allaah laa quwwata illa Billaah (That which Allaah wills (will come to pass)! There is no power but with Allaah)”. They take as evidence for this an aayah in Soorat al-Kahf and a hadeeth.

The aayah in question is (interpretation of the meaning):

“It was better for you to say, when you entered your garden: ‘That which Allaah wills (will come to pass)! There is no power but with Allaah!’” [al-Kahf 18:39]. But this is not evidence (daleel), because the subject of the aayah has nothing to do with hasad (envy); in fact, Allaah destroyed his garden because of his kufr and transgression.

The hadeeth in question was reported from Anas ibn Maalik (may Allaah be pleased with him), saying that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said, “Whoever sees something that he likes, and says, ‘Ma sha Allaah laa quwwata illa Billaah’, the evil eye will not affect him.” But this hadeeth is da’eef jiddan (very weak)!

Al-Haythami said: this was narrated by al-Bazzaar from the report of Abu Bakr al-Hudhali, who is da’eef jiddan (very weak). (Majma’ al-Zawaa’id, 5/21).

And Allaah knows best.


Islam Q&A
Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid